The Brain from the Moral Point of View. The Notion of the Neurobiological Recalibration of Ethics

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Barbara Chyrowicz

Abstract

A proposal for the neurobiological recalibration of ethics termed as neuroethics has been presented by Patricia S. Churchland. Churchland claims that the more we understand the details of regulatory systems in the brain, the more we are convinced that our moral standards and practices reside in neurobiology. The term "neuroethics" has been used since 2002 to describe a new subdiscipline of ethics. Neuroethics has two main branches: the first, and most fundamental, is concerned with the moral problems related to the application of neuroscientific discoveries, the other, the neuroscience of ethics, refers to the impact of neuroscientific knowledge on our understanding of ethics. This article discuss the unique character of this new discipline and seeks to show that, while neurobiology affects our actions, it does not determine their moral dimension.

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How to Cite
CHYROWICZ, B. The Brain from the Moral Point of View. The Notion of the Neurobiological Recalibration of Ethics. Diametros, p. 1-33, 3 Sep. 2019.
Section
Articles
Author Biography

Barbara Chyrowicz, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Barbara Chyrowicz, PhD

The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin

Department of Philosophy

Al. Raclawickie 14

PL-20-950 Lublin

e-mail: barbarac@kul.pl

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