Solidarity in Healthcare – the Challenge of Dementia

Aleksandra Małgorzata Głos

About author

Aleksandra Małgorzata Głos
Jagiellonian University
PhD Candidate at the Law Faculty and research assistant in the Institute of Philosophy Jagiellonian University in Kraków
ul. Grodzka 52
31-044 Kraków
Poland
Email: olaglos@gmail.com

Abstract


Dementia will soon be ranked as the world’s largest economy. At present, it ranges from the 16th to 18th place, with countries such as Indonesia, the Netherlands, and Turkey. Dementia is not only a financial challenge, but also a philosophical one. It provokes a paradigm shift in the traditional view of healthcare and expands the classic concepts of human personhood and autonomy. A promising response to these challenges is the idea of cooperative solidarity. Cooperative solidarity, contrary to its ‘humanitarian’ version, promotes spontaneous teamwork and individual initiative. It obliges us not only to help 'the suffering, the troubled and the disadvantaged’, but above all to support those who already do so for spontaneous moral or affective reasons. In the field of dementia study, solidary initiatives are described within the framework of supportive care.


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DOI:

http://dx.doi.org/10.13153/diam.49.2016.918

Article links:

Default URL: http://www.diametros.iphils.uj.edu.pl/index.php/diametros/article/view/918
English abstract URL: http://www.diametros.iphils.uj.edu.pl/index.php/diametros/article/view/918/en

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